The Huang Embossing hammer is an embossing hammer created with master metalsmith David Huang to create bold, dramatic forms on hollowware vessels.

 

David uses the term "hammer chasing" to describe how he uses these hammers. With hammer chasing, the vessel is filled with pitch or microcrystaline wax (as David prefers) and you can fairly quickly alter the overall form of the vessel in dramatic ways that would take much longer with chasing tools. 

 

In particular David finds he likes using these to create ridges and troughs that make a few contour lines around the piece. The series he's titled Lustrous Contours are all vessels where he's employed hammer chasing as the sole approach to embellishing the initial vessel form. On his Luminious relic series he often uses this technique to rough out the dramatic shapes before refining and embellishing them with chasing tools.

 

David's available Artwork can be seen HERE

 

This petit hammer is forged and hardend from 1045. It has a 5oz head and is just over 2-3/4" long for maximum control. Each hammer has 2  slightly canted and highly polished faces that are 3/4" wide x 3/8" and 1/4" tall respectively.

 

There are two versions of the Huang Embossing hammer. One has a rounded face for creating concave shapes or "troughs and valleys", while the other has a flatter face to create a smoother surface on convex surface or flat planes and ridges.

 

Each hammer is fitted with my signature osage orange handle. David wanted a handle that was comfortable to use in two different positions: From a lower grip to maximize power and efficiency, and from a choked up position to maximize control for the finishing touches. What we came up with, was a slimmed down version of the handle on his raising hammer. Measuring in at just under 11" this handle has a distinct oblong profile to prevent twisting in the hand, and with an extended bulge to create a mix of ergonomics,  fine control and power transfer that really make this hammer a joy to use.

 

"Hammer chasing has been a dynamic technique for me in transforming the look and feel of my chased vessels. If you do, or are interested in doing similar work I hope you get these hammers and find them as wonderful to use as I do!"  David Huang

 

You can see David demonstrating how he uses the hammers HERE

 

Hammers could take up to 2 weeks to ship, usually sooner. If you are in a hurry, please contact Saign directly to check availability

 

All measurements are approximate

Huang Embossing Hammer

$239.99Price
  • At the young age of eleven I decided I wanted to be an artist when I grew up.  For some reason I never seriously wavered from that path and devoted much of my time to learning and improving my skills.  In high school I discovered metalsmithing and was immediately enamored with the material and processes involved.  I had always had this sense in my head that it took big, powerful industrial tools to shape metal.  When I discovered that with just the power of my arm and a hair thin saw blade I could cut shapes with great precision I was hooked.  Shortly thereafter I became enthralled with how the humble hammer could form metal into almost any shape desired.

    After an extended 12 year college “career” I finally earned my BFA with an emphasis in metalsmithing from Grand Valley State University.  It is at Grand Valley that I discovered the raising process I use to form my vessels from flat sheet, still using that humble hammer and the power of my arm.

    In 2003 I finally achieved that goal of my young eleven year old self and was able to sustain full-time career as an artist.  It was not an easy dream to achieve, but for me it was worth seeking.  I now spend my days at my Michigan home/studio working to bring objects of beauty, light, and inspiration into the world.

     

    Working full-time as a self-employed artist, David is represented by galleries around the US. His work has been featured in Metalsmith Magazine, American Craft, and numerous other books and publications.

     

    You can find out more about David and his work at:

     

    https://davidhuang.org